In the Kitchen: Pear Juice Caviar


pear juice caviar

Happy holidays everyone! Thanks for your readership this year, and I hope you’ve found at least some of my reviews useful.

Here’s a little something different this holiday season, something fun for the whole family to partake o

f for you to serve at your next gathering: juice caviar.

My experimented with pear juice, but really all liquids (perhaps outside of whiskey — because I tried) go.

My always creative sister gifted me with a spherification kit from the Modernist Pantry this year! It takes some practice, but if even a klutz in the kitchen like myself can make them, you can too.

The photo below shows you what comes in the kit, in addition to a kitchen scale that my mom got me earlier this year. This scale, we found out needs to be highly precise, because you’ll be measuring these powders to the half gram.

Modernist Pantry Spherification kitIt only requires a few milliliters of juice to make a whole bunch of caviar. In fact, we halved the recipe portions. You’ll want to end up with a creamy, but not pasty, mix that you strain to get the air bubbles out of.

They recommend you let is sit in the fridge for two hours to let the air bubbles rise, but we didn’t have the time, so just went with it. We ended up seeing air bubbles within the caviar, which isn’t the end of the world, just perhaps less aesthetically pleasing.

The art comes in how you inject the mix into the water with calcium chloride. Holding the needle about six inches above the surface of the water to form perfect spheres.

pear juice caviar - the mix pear juice caviar - mix settling in pear juice caviar straining pear juice caviar - filling the needle pear juice caviar - into the calcium chloride

They say to let it sit in the water for a few minutes, but the sooner you scoop them out, the thinner the membrane is. We liked it this way because you can taste more of the juice within the caviar.

pear juice caviar water bathsModernist Pantrycherry juice caviarIt’s as simple a gastronomy experiment as it can get and makes any beverage or dish look that much more complex.

Float any of the fruit juice caviars in a glass of champagne, or I plan to make savory ones from yuzu or ponzu sauce to add on top of crostinis or even sushi.

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